JeVois Tutorials  1.16
JeVois Smart Embedded Machine Vision Tutorials
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Creating composite output video frames

Many of the machine vision modules that come with JeVois feature nice composite displays that show machine vision results side-by-side with the original video captured by JeVois.

This tutorial will show you how to achieve this in Python + OpenCV. We will use JeVois Inventor because it makes programming Python modules for JeVois so much easier.

Plan you display

First think about your layout. Why do you need several display panels and what information do you want them to convey?

For this tutorial, we will assume that we want to show the original 320x240 video captured by JeVois at left, some 320x240 machine vision results at right, and a 50-pixel-tall area for messages below.

Create your module

  • Select New Python Module... from the pull-down menu of JeVois Inventor (or press CTRL-N).
  • Fill in the details as shown below:

A few notes:

  • Based on the above proposed layout, and for input video that is 320x240, our output video should hence be 640 pixels wide (for the two side-by-side video images) by 290 pixels tall (240 of the input video plus 50 for our message area).
  • This can be changed later by editing videomappings.cfg, in case you decide to later add more panels to your output image.

Allow JeVois to restart, select your new module from the Vision Module pull-down menu, and switch to the Code tab.

Write the code

Let us start simple by just creating a machine vision processing result that is just a blurred version of the input.

We create our composite displays as follows:

import libjevois as jevois
import cv2
import numpy as np
class CompoTest:
def process(self, inframe, outframe):
# Get the next camera frame as BGR:
img = inframe.getCvBGR()
# Blur it with a 11x11 kernel; this is our result image:
res = cv2.blur(img, (11, 11))
# Horizontally concatenate input at left + result at right:
sidebyside = np.hstack((img, res))
# Create dark-gray (value 80) image for the bottom panel, 50 pixels tall:
msgbox = np.zeros((50, sidebyside.shape[1], 3), dtype = np.uint8) + 80
# Write some text in the bottom panel:
cv2.putText(msgbox, 'Hello JeVois!', (10, 40), cv2.FONT_HERSHEY_SIMPLEX,
1, (255,255,255), 2, cv2.LINE_AA)
# Stack bottom panel below side by side images:
out = np.vstack((sidebyside, msgbox))
# Send off the result:
outframe.sendCv(out)

And here it is:

A few things to remember:

  • OpenCV and numpy use the linear algebra matrix convention for images, where the first index is row (y) and the second column (x). For example, see the size we used in the np.zeros() call or the indices of np.shape.
  • But they use the image processing convention for things like coordinates, where the first index is x and the second y. See for example the coordinates of the text in cv2.putText().
  • If you write your code in a manner that does not assume a specific input video size, then you will be able to use it with different camera sensor resolutions. For example, in the above, we use sidebyside.shape[1] instead of just 640 as the width of our side-by-side image.

Mixing pixel types

Sometimes results will be obtained which are not in the same pixel format as the input. In such case, just convert those back to BGR before assembling your final composite output.

Here, for example, let us change our results to grayscale by using a Canny edge detector instead of a color blur. We then use cv2.cvtColor() to convert the grayscale edge map back to BGR before creating the side-by-side image:

import libjevois as jevois
import cv2
import numpy as np
class CompoTest:
def process(self, inframe, outframe):
# Get the next camera frame as BGR:
img = inframe.getCvBGR()
# Compute edges in the image; this is our grayscale result:
res = cv2.Canny(img, 100, 200) # new code
# Convert the grayscale results to BGR:
resbgr = cv2.cvtColor(res, cv2.COLOR_GRAY2BGR) # new code
# Horizontally concatenate input at left + result at right:
sidebyside = np.hstack((img, resbgr)) # modified code
# Create dark-gray (value 80) image for the bottom panel, 50 pixels tall:
msgbox = np.zeros((50, sidebyside.shape[1], 3), dtype = np.uint8) + 80
# Write some text in the bottom panel:
cv2.putText(msgbox, 'Hello JeVois!', (10, 40), cv2.FONT_HERSHEY_SIMPLEX,
1, (255,255,255), 2, cv2.LINE_AA)
# Stack bottom panel below side by side images:
out = np.vstack((sidebyside, msgbox))
# Send off the result:
outframe.sendCv(out)

Going deeper

The method explained in this tutorial works well and is intuitive, but there is significant CPU cost associated with copying and concatenating the BGR images.

A more efficient approach is to directly paste input and result images into the output image buffer that will be sent over USB. This more advanced but more efficient approach is briefly explained in the Tutorial on how to write new machine vision modules in Python, section on "More fine-grained control using JeVois raw images".